Uga Georgia Magazine Join the UGA Alumni Association
 
  Search Sept 1998-
June 2004
 

IN THIS ISSUE
June 2008
Vol 87: No. 3
 
  From the President
 
  From the Editor
 
  Cover Story
The man and his art
 
 
  Features
 
  Closeups
 
  Around the Arch
 
  Alumni News & Events
 
  Alumni Profiles
 
  Class Notes
  Class Notes Extras
 
  Back Page
 
  Back Issues
  Contact Us
Staff
 
  Ad Rates
  Change Address
RELATED SITES
UGA Home
UGA Today
Columns
Campus Calendar
Alumni Online
The Georgia Fund
Gift Planning
Georgia Magazine
706-542-8059 (voice)
706-583-0368 (fax)
University of Georgia
286 Oconee St., Ste. 200 North
Athens, GA 30602-1999
 
 
 


 

Progress in diversity

In 1996, 15 percent of the student body came from “underrepresented populations,” which includes African Americans and Latinos as well as poor, white South Georgians.





Email
Print
In 1996, 15 percent of the student body came from “underrepresented populations,” which includes African Americans and Latinos as well as poor, white South Georgians. This year, that number is 23 percent, or almost a quarter of the student body.

In January 2006, Adams announced the University would use $2 million over at least four years for scholarships for underrepresented student groups. The money also would begin building an endowment managed by the Arch Foundation to support the scholarships.

In 2002, UGA received a $3.5 million grant from The Goizueta Foundation of Atlanta to help Georgia schools better educate the state’s growing Latino population. In May 2006, the University received another $4 million grant from that foundation to continue its efforts begun four years earlier. They include scholarship programs and a center that helps schools, teachers and parents improve the academic success of Latino children in grades K-12. UGA announced in July that five undergraduate students would receive The Goizueta Foundation Scholarship worth $3,000 for the 2007-08 academic year.

In fall 2005, the Hispanic Scholarship Fund and the U.S. Department of Education picked UGA and the University of Texas at Austin to each receive $1.8 million to develop programs to better prepare Latino students for higher education.

“This is what land-grant universities are about, access and opportunity for everybody,” Adams says. “If I had not had the quality public education I had in the ’40s and ’50s, I wouldn’t be sitting here today. I have real empathy for people born with less than a full chance.”



Top of Page