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Recently, members of the University of Georgia Sigma Alpha professional agricultural sorority did just that.

Holding a baby, looking and smiling at her, talking to him, responding quickly when he cries, and other activities build trust.

In the shadow of a rundown block building in Los Palis, Haiti, children wearing tattered clothes bit into half-ripened mangoes they picked from the ground…

Bacteria don’t have easy lives. In addition to mammalian immune systems that besiege the bugs, they have natural enemies called bacteriophages, viruses that kill half the bacteria on Earth every two days.

Before patting yourself on the back for resisting that cookie or kicking yourself for giving in to temptation, look around. A new UGA study has revealed that self-control—or the lack thereof—is contagious.

University of Georgia researcher Gary Hawkins looks at rotting fruits and vegetables differently than most people. Where they may see useless balls of moldy fuzz, he sees fuel.

A new UGA study is exploring how the interaction of the environment and one’s genetic makeup can influence drug use vulnerability in rural African Americans.

UGA scientists looking to understand the genetic mechanisms of plant defense and growth have found an inverse relationship between gene duplication and alternative splicing in plants.

By growing nanoscale wire brushes—built of the body’s own molecules—that conduct electrical charges, University of Georgia researchers have taken a first step toward developing biological fuel cells that could ultimately power pacemakers, cochlear implants, and prosthetic limbs.

Macy couldn’t stop sneezing. Even after several blades of grass were flushed from the two-year-old’s nose, something still tickled her nasal cavity.

A pest survey led by researchers at the University of Georgia and the Georgia Forestry Commission has found that an exotic wood-boring ambrosia beetle that can attack living trees and has the potential to cause economic damage across the country…

The Vidalia onion is Georgia’s official state vegetable and No. 1 fresh vegetable crop. But like any major crop, it has its fair share of problems—ones UGA researchers want to fix.

UGA physicist Yiping Zhao says nanoscience is big science—the kind that will change lives. Its nearly invisible scale is precisely what makes its potential so tremendous.

Two University of Georgia animal science researchers introduced to the world 13 pigs that may hold the key to new therapies to treat human diseases, including diabetes.