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When Denise Logan read an article in the Athens Banner-Herald about the need for more extracurricular programs at the Oconee Street Boys & Girls Club, she saved it.

Parasites can decimate amphibian populations, but one University of Georgia researcher believes they might also play a role in spurring the evolution of new and sometimes bizarre breeding strategies.

More than 23 million Americans age 12 or older need treatment for substance abuse and addiction, yet only a fraction – less than 10 percent – actually receive it.

Prescription drug ads on television first hit the airwaves just more than a decade ago, but a new UGA study finds that most of them still do not present a fair balance of information, especially when it comes to the…

When Hazel Wetzstein holds a tiny Georgia plume plant, she’s not just tending a future shrub. She’s keeping a native species from becoming extinct.

Many people claim to get their best ideas while on the elliptical machine, doing laps in the pool, or jogging along a quiet road, and scientists have consistently documented that exercise provides adults with cognitive benefits. But what about children?…

What began as a breakfast-table discussion between two UGA professors has led to a grant, from the Program in International Research and Education of the National Science Foundation, to study how various species from China have become invasive in the…

A bit more than half a century ago, a musical called West Side Story opened on Broadway.

There’s a moment in a scientist’s life—at least in the movies—when a virtual light bulb goes off and a new idea is born.

Too much of a good thing can have disastrous effects.

His drinking water smelled like old bait-shrimp, and the Putnam County homeowner wanted Keith Fielder, the local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent, to tell him why. What they found swimming around in his well still hasn’t been identified.

Television news audiences are divided along party lines like never before, according to a UGA study that warns the trend may have damaging consequences for political discourse and democracy in America.

University of Georgia researchers have developed a new technology that promises to dramatically increase the yield of ethanol from readily available non-food crops such as Bermudagrass, switchgrass, Napiergrass—and even yard waste.