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Mean boys, not mean girls, rule at school

Mean boys, not mean girls, rule at school

December 14, 2014

A UGA study turns the tables on the common belief that girls are more relationally aggressive in school. Read More

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Study links primary care shortage with salary disparities

Study links primary care shortage with salary disparities

Maximizing Research Opportunities

The nation’s shortage of primary care physicians has been linked to a host of poor health outcomes, and a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that salary disparities play a major role in the shortage.

Facebook profiles can be used to detect narcissism

Facebook profiles can be used to detect narcissism

Maximizing Research Opportunities

A new University of Georgia study suggests that online social networking sites such as Facebook might be useful tools for detecting whether someone is a narcissist.

UGA given $4.1 million for bee research

UGA given $4.1 million for bee research

Maximizing Research Opportunities

Almost half the bee colonies in the United States died last winter.

UGARF licensing revenues reach record levels

UGARF licensing revenues reach record levels

Maximizing Research Opportunities

The University of Georgia Research Foundation announced last week that its licensing revenues increased to $23.75 million in fiscal year 2008, an increase of 47 percent from the last year.

Profitable organic farming

Profitable organic farming

Maximizing Research Opportunities

Research at the Agroecology Laboratory at the UGA Odum School of Ecology has led to the creation of organic farming enterprise budgets.

Study: Even occasional smoking can impair arteries

Study: Even occasional smoking can impair arteries

Maximizing Research Opportunities

Even occasional cigarette smoking can impair the functioning of your arteries, according to a new University of Georgia study that used ultrasound to measure how the arteries of young, healthy adults respond to changes in blood flow.